Monday, February 23, 2015

#AskAnsip - so I did, and he gave an unambiguous answer


Friday, February 20, 2015

Guest blog: the real threat to the open internet is zero-rated content 2

Guest blog: the real threat to the open internet is zero-rated content (continued) – World Wide Web Foundation: "According to Digital Fuel Monitor, while there are 92 zero-rating reported discriminations in OECD, we did not find a single case of ‘fast lanes’ discrimination. Why did the FCC propose to ban a discriminatory practice like ‘fast lanes’ with no real market examples while it ignored the most common discrimination form which is also present in the US? Note that President Obama, in his intervention, asked for an explicit ban “on paid prioritization and any other restriction that has a similar effect”." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The real threat to the open Internet is zero-rated content

Guest blog: the real threat to the open Internet is zero-rated content – World Wide Web Foundation: "In Europe, ten small member states put forward a net neutrality proposal that, if adopted, would ban harmful price discrimination practices such as zero-rating. The proposal is fiercely opposed by big EU member states and their dominant telecom groups. The Netherlands and Slovenia, two countries that have already enshrined real net neutrality in their national laws, issued enforcement orders for zero-rating violations. In January, the Dutch Consumer and Markets Authority, ACM, fined Vodafone for zero-rating HBO Go mobile video streaming while the Slovenian regulator ordered Telekom Slovenia and Telekom Austria to stop zero-rating music streaming and cloud storage applications. Chile’s 2014 net neutrality legislation also bans price discrimination practices such as zero-rating. In 2014, the Norwegian, German and Austrian telecom regulators publicly asserted that zero-rating infringes net neutrality." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Virgin Media's snubbing of rural communities 'a travesty' says ex-BT CTO

Virgin Media's snubbing of rural communities 'a travesty' says ex-BT CTO - 16 Feb 2015 - Computing News: ""Somebody like Virgin could put a ‘village pump' [i.e. a hotspot] in and stand back and watch what happens", he said. Referring to Scandinavia's example again, he believes a fast broadband hotspot could simply be installed in the village, while locals work on the infrastructure.

"I think the UK has missed a big trick, because absolutely none of the BT UK funding has gone to the rural community - it's all gone to BT", he added.
"And this just seems to me to be a travesty. We put Wi-Fi in with no funding whatsoever, whereas BT wanted £140,000 to put fibre into the village. If Virgin are going to do anything radical, they could have done something like that."

Cochrane is also concerned that, with an ongoing emphasis on fibre to the cabinet [FTTC] rather than FTTH, "the big worry is the fantastic waste of money of putting in fibre to the cabinet with copper, and then in five years rip it all out and put in fibre to the home, and start all over again." 'via Blog this'

Pepper of Cisco: Traffic Peaks are More Extreme

Pepper of Cisco: Traffic Peaks are More Extreme: "Busy-hour Internet traffic is growing more rapidly than average Internet traffic. Busy-hour (or the busiest 60‑minute period in a day) Internet traffic increased 32 percent in 2013, compared with 25 percent growth in average traffic. Busy-hour Internet traffic will increase by a factor of 3.4 between 2013 and 2018, while average Internet traffic will increase 2.8-fold." 'via Blog this'

10 Gig - repeat, 10 gig - to 800K apartments in Hong Kong

10 Gig - repeat, 10 gig - to 800K apartments in Hong Kong: "Soon, the cost to the telco for 10 gigabits will be little different than the cost of ten megabits.  1 gig service over fiber costs the carrier very little more than 10 or 100 megabits. Equipment going in today is almost all ready for a gig. There's rarely any savings using obsolete gear that tops out at lower speeds. PCCW's Hong Kong telco has now upped the ante, bringing a ten gig - presumably XGPON - to all 800,000 fiber customers. Trials have begun and they expect to cover nearly all 800K by the end of 2015. " 'via Blog this'

Monday, February 16, 2015

Zero rating and its discontents: Millions of Facebook users have no idea they’re using the internet

Millions of Facebook users have no idea they’re using the internet - Quartz: "But a closer look at the data (available in full here) shows that 11% of Indonesians who said they used Facebook also said they did not use the internet. In Nigeria, 9% of Facebook users said they do not use the internet. These are largely young people; the median age of respondents with this combination of answers is 25 in Indonesia and 22 in Nigeria." 'via Blog this'

Premier League TV: BT shares up as Sky falls on concerns it overpaid

Premier League TV rights bidding war sends BT shares up as Sky falls on concerns it overpaid - Business News - Business - London Evening Standard: "Analysts at Deutsche Bank suggested Sky could push up subscriptions by £1 a month but have doubts about its planned £200-million-a-year savings, saying they would “test market credulity”.

 There is also concern that Sky is now locked into a cycle of football rights bidding after its takeover of its sister companies in Germany and Italy.

Bundesliga rights come up for auction in 2016, Serie A in Italy in 2017 and then Premier League again in 2018.

 BT paid £7.6 million per game while Sky paid £11 million. Between them they are paying an average £113,000 a minute for live Premier League coverage." 'via Blog this'

Virgin Media eyes BT with £3bn fibre investment - Sky pours £4billion cash down Premier football drain

Virgin Media eyes BT with £3bn fibre broadband investment- The Inquirer: "The investment, dubbed 'Project Lightning', will also increase the network's reach from 13 million to 17 million homes and businesses by 2020 as the firm looks to boost its current five million customer base.
Virgin Media also claims that it can offer broadband speeds of 152Mbps, at least double the fastest speeds available from rivals BT, TalkTalk and Sky.
Tom Mockridge, Virgin Media CEO, said: "Millions of homes and businesses will soon be able to benefit for the first time from broadband speeds at least twice as fast as those available from the other major providers.
"Consumers and business owners who want to make the switch to better broadband speeds now have an alternative: you can call on Virgin Media to 'Cable My Street'."  
However, the 'Cable My Street' initiative could mean that rural areas suffering from slow broadband speeds could continue to suffer."

Meanwhile, on a desperate Planet Football where BT mugged Sky into believing they could outbid them

'via Blog this'

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Mobile Data-centric Price Plans – An illustration of the De-compose

Mobile Data-centric Price Plans – An illustration of the De-composed. | techneconomyblog:

"That AA’s data-centric plans for double speed appears to be cheaper than their plans at a lower data delivery quality level is not consistent with costing.

Of course, AA cannot really guaranty that the customer will get double 4G speed everywhere and as such it may not be fair to charge substantially more than for single speed. However, this is of course not what appear to happen here.

 AA’s lowest data unit price (in per Giga Byte) is around 0.6 – 0.7 (or 0.06 – 0.07 Cent per Mega Byte). That price is very low and in all likelihood lower than their actual production cost of a GB or MB." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Motion for a resolution on the renewal of the mandate of the Internet Governance Forum - B8-0130/2015

Motion for a resolution on the renewal of the mandate of the Internet Governance Forum - B8-0130/2015: The European Parliament:

"10. Stresses that it is crucial to continue efforts to ensure legal protection of the open internet and the concept of net neutrality, as an indispensable precondition for safeguarding freedom of information and expression, to boost growth and jobs by developing innovation and business opportunities related to the internet, and to promote and safeguard cultural and linguistic diversity;

 11.    Stresses that fundamental freedoms and human rights are not negotiable and must be protected online; regrets that some states attempt to curb the global connectivity of their citizens by censorship and other restrictions, and rejects the idea of a state-controlled internet;

 12.    Stresses the economic and social importance of online rights for privacy and of users’ control of their personal data; considers such rights to be fundamental for an open and neutral internet and for a level playing field for businesses on the web;" 'via Blog this'