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Monday, January 15, 2018

States Push Back After Net Neutrality Repeal - The New York Times

States Push Back After Net Neutrality Repeal - The New York Times: " lawsuits against the commission are expected shortly after the policy becomes official. Last week, a lobbying group for big technology companies including Facebook, Google and Netflix announced that it planned to join the lawsuits, giving the opposition substantial new resources. More than a dozen state attorneys general have also announced plans to sue the commission.

 But state lawmakers say they cannot wait around to see what happens with those efforts.

State Representative Norma Smith, a Republican who introduced the other bill in Washington, said net neutrality was an important safeguard for small businesses that might not be able to pay internet service companies for fast speeds. Even though Republicans in Washington, D.C., supported the repeal, she said many Republicans in her state supported her bill." 'via Blog this'

Monday, January 08, 2018

How Law and Computer Science Can Work Together to Improve the Information Society | January 2018 | Communications of the ACM

How Law and Computer Science Can Work Together to Improve the Information Society | January 2018 | Communications of the ACM: "Net neutrality is a simple term that describes the complicated reality of highly complex engineering task: how to permit sufficient permission-free innovation in the network. The over-politicized doomsayers on both sides fail to mention what is becoming abundantly clear: policy can only partially steer traffic management practices. Net neutrality can do no more than prevent large telecoms companies continuing blocking Skype and WhatsApp or throttling back video traffic their subscribers want to see.

Net neutrality cannot stop innovation by telecoms companies (whose own corporate histories show a somewhat checkered relationship with Internet protocol network deployment). Regulators are simply not that competent, even if they had the resources and will to carry out laws to the letter, which they do not. More scientific exploration of the limited effects of Net neutrality policies would be rather useful. An example of regulators trying to do this in a non-confrontational manner is the extensive work produced by the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications.

 Heroic policy interventions by government often fail, especially when aimed at industry self-regulation.

How can legislators discuss complex laws when they do not know the difference between an Internet access provider (IAP) and an Internet service provider (ISP)? In European law, an access provider (telco) is an 'Electronic Communications Service Provider' (ECSP), distinct from an Information Society Service Provider (ISSP). 'Information Society' was Europe's rhetorical counterpoint to Al Gore's 'Information Superhighway.' Lawyers often fail to master these terms.

Minimal rules made sensibly by technically proficient people are achieving quietly what millions of email messages to regulators and legislators cannot: conduct rules to stop telecoms companies blocking legitimate content while giving them the latitude to experiment where not harmful to the public Internet. Note that common carriage was a rather successful way of delivering public (alongside private and business) communications services in previous technologies." 'via Blog this'

FCC issues final order dismantling net neutrality - CNET

FCC issues final order dismantling net neutrality - CNET: "The Federal Communications Commission released on Thursday the final text of its order repealing controversial Obama-era net neutrality regulations.

The 539-page Restoring Internet Freedom Order comes about three weeks after the agency voted 3-2 along party lines to dismantle rules passed in 2015 to ensure that all traffic on the internet is treated equally and to prevent broadband and wireless providers from blocking or slowing online content. The agency also voted to eliminate the legal foundation that gives the FCC oversight of internet service providers." 'via Blog this'

Friday, December 22, 2017

SCL: Predictions 2018

SCL: Predictions 2018 - 5: "Prediction: Ajit Pai abolishes net neutrality at the 14 December FCC meeting, then the courts stay his action in 2018. This net neutrality issue will run forever." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Strand on Net Neutrality in EU after 1 Year: Unintended Consequences for operators, content providers, and consumers

Net Neutrality in EU after 1 Year: Unintended Consequences for operators, content providers, and consumers: "Desperate EU gamble for popularity.

The European Commission and Parliament made a gamble to regulate net neutrality and roaming in the same legislation, on the desperate hope that the EU could translate Europeans love of the interent and mobile communications into love of EU government. The EU claims that the reason for the legislation was to protect and guarantee the engine of Internet innovation, but the regime fails on both fronts. The privacy of users is being violated by invasive measurement and blocks against securing networks.

As for innovation, there are little to no examples of new European developments since the legislation. If anything, the EU continues to fall behind the US and East Asia in Internet innovation." 'via Blog this'

5 crazy things that happened as the FCC voted to undo its net neutrality rules - The Washington Post

5 crazy things that happened as the FCC voted to undo its net neutrality rules - The Washington Post: "On the “Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” Colbert compared Verizon's and Comcast's promises not to block, slow down or prioritize Web traffic to the “shark lobby” promising not to eat people, despite pushing regulators to reclassify their mouths as “sleeping bags.”

 “By killing net neutrality, Internet providers can basically do whatever they want, as long as they disclose to their users what exactly they do to Web traffic. So, get ready for more fine print from your Internet provider. At least you’ll have something to read while you wait for website to load,” Colbert joked.

 He also mocked FCC chairman Ajit Pai for starring in an anti-net-neutrality video published by conservative news site the Daily Caller, that appeared to target young people by using memes and pop culture references. To lampoon Pai, Colbert, in shades and an offset baseball cap that said “Snapgram,” pretended to connect with millennials, or “chicken nugget teens” by exclaiming “Szechuan sauce!” and taking a selfie using an avocado as a camera." 'via Blog this'

Monday, December 18, 2017

Kieran McCarthy: 5 reasons why America's Ctrl-Z on net neutrality rules is a GOOD thing • The Register

5 reasons why America's Ctrl-Z on net neutrality rules is a GOOD thing • The Register: "If you sign up to the Platinum Double Plus package, you are going to get an internet so fast it will blow your socks off. And all the best content, carefully curated for you by your cable company. Think 3D gaming. Think 8K video.

You will be the envy of your street. You will be better than them. They suck. You're great. And it will only cost $200 a month. That's the price of just two coffees a day. And, for a limited time only, you can get it for just $150 a month." 'via Blog this'